Museums Attendance Italy

More free entry to Italy’s museums

Changes to admission fees and opening hours start this summer

Starting 1 July, the country's major venues, including the Colosseum, Pompeii and the Uffizi Gallery (above), will be open until 10pm every Friday

It pays to be young, at least at Italy’s museums and archaeological sites. Starting from 1 July, senior citizens, aged over 65, who were previously given free entry, will be charged full-price admission, while teenagers under 18 will still be allowed to visit for free.

Speaking last week, during an annual conference on cultural affairs organised by the newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore, the culture minister, Dario Franceschini, said that the changes to admission and opening hours would bring Italy in line with other EU countries.

An analysis of attendance at Italy’s national museums and heritage sites showed that more than a third of visitors did not pay to enter under the current ticketing system, Franceschini said. The aim is “to make free entry more equal”, and so all visitors will be allowed in without charge every first Sunday of the month, Franceschini added.

Other new initiatives introduced by the culture minister include twice-yearly late-night openings (8pm-midnight) with tickets costing €1, and extended hours until 10pm every Friday at major venues, including the Colosseum, Pompeii and the Uffizi Gallery.

More from The Art Newspaper

Comments

25 Jun 14
19:33 CET

GIANFRANCO ZABBIA, CAPE TOWN SOUTH AFRICA

I'm. 67 , Italian , I go home to Italy from time to time. Its not fair that the senior citizens that come home should pay the same as the employied young people.

Submit a comment

All comments are moderated. If you would like your comment to be approved, please use your real name, not a pseudonym. We ask for your email address in case we wish to contact you - it will not be made public and we do not use it for any other purpose.

Email*
 
Name*
 
City*
 
Comment*
 

Want to write a longer comment to this article? Email letters@theartnewspaper.com

 

Share this