Purdue Pharma

Activists including the artist Nan Goldin protest bankruptcy settlement shielding the Sackler family from prosecution

Demonstrators plant cardboard tombstones outside a New York courthouse to call attention to Purdue Pharma’s role in deaths from the opioid painkiller Oxycontin

Nan Goldin and Pain are helping opioid crisis victims file claims against Sackler-owned Purdue Pharma

The artist says the coronavirus health crisis “has made life even more difficult" for drug users and recovering addicts

Nan Goldin brings Pain to Purdue Pharma bankruptcy hearings in New York

Demonstrators at the White Plains courthouse kept up the pressure to hold Sackler family accountable in opioid crisis, as a $10bn settlement hangs in the balance

USAnews

Sackler family agrees to give up 'entire value' of Purdue Pharma in bid to settle opioid cases

But state attorneys general predict an imminent bankruptcy filing as settlement talks break down

Lawnews

‘Completely unacceptable’: Nan Goldin attacks proposed settlement in opioid crisis

Artist says the reported deal is a cynical attempt to avoid significant restitution

Lawnews

Sacklers in talks over multibillion-dollar settlement of opioid crisis lawsuits

Proposed settlement calls for family's company Purdue Pharma to file for bankruptcy and become a public trust distributing profits

The Met says it will stop accepting gifts from Sacklers associated with Purdue Pharma

The museum cites recent lawsuits tied to the US opioid crisis in its decision to decline future donations from the family

Tate to stop accepting donations from the Sackler Trust

The move follows a mutual decision by the National Portrait Gallery and the Sackler Trust to not proceed with a £1m grant

London's National Portrait Gallery and Sackler Trust to 'not proceed' with £1m grant

Mutual decision comes amid controversy over trust's connection to Purdue Pharma, maker of OxyContin, a prescription painkiller linked to the opioid crisis

Museums in the changing world order: a question of ethics

In the first part of a new series, Adrian Ellis looks at the increased public scrutiny of museum boards in the social media age

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