Review
Books

Renaissance prints as sources of images for maiolica and bronze reliefs

The interactions of Renaissance drawing, printing and ceramics

Unknown engraver after Michelangelo, The Dream of Human Life (around 1540) © President and Fellows of Harvard College
Venetian or Paduan maiolica, Plate with the Dream of Daniel (1545) Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

It is well known that in the Renaissance and Early Modern era prints made paintings and sculpture known throughout Europe and were the primary medium of artistic exchanges. But it has not been so well recognised that printed images were also transmitted, transformed and translated into ceramics and bronze reliefs. This book is the first to explore the impact of “high” on “decorative” art, with remarkable examples of designs by Mantegna, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Raphael, Michelangelo- Unknown engraver after Michelangelo, The Dream of Human Life (around 1540) and Venetian or Paduan maiolica, Plate with the Dream of Daniel (1545)—Parmigianino and Dürer. The author is the curator of Old Master prints at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, where the exhibition for which this book was written took place earlier this year.

  • Jamie Gabbarelli, Sharing Images: Renaissance Prints into Maiolica and Bronze, Lund Humphries in association with the National Gallery of Art, 144pp, £30 (hb)