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Sign up for our second 'New Models for New Times' event on 15 October: Breaking boundaries—local is the new global

Globalisation has shaped the art market we know today, but will the current shift to the local be a help or hindrance to emerging markets in Africa and Asia? Featuring Rachel Lehmann, Sundaram Tagore, Rakeb Sile and Ayo Adeyinka. Presented in partnership with Cromwell Place

As Covid-19 drastically curtails air travel, the art world's global status is being radically revised. In this panel, dealers from Africa, Asia and the US will discuss how they grapple with running galleries for both local and international audiences, how the pandemic has impacted emerging markets and how they continue to foster cross-cultural dialogue as some borders remain closed. Moderated by Anny Shaw, contributing art market editor at The Art Newspaper. Presented in partnership with Cromwell Place.

15 October, 12pm EDT/5pm BST

Register here.

Meet the panellists:

Rachel Lehmann

Rachel Lehmann, Lehmann Maupin, New York, London, Hong Kong and Seoul

Rachel Lehmann was born in Asmara, Ethiopia, and studied at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. She started her career as the proprietor of two contemporary galleries in Geneva and Lausanne, Switzerland, where she showed young artists who have since become internationally acclaimed, such as Jeff Koons, David Salle and Candida Höfer. Lehmann has served on the International Council of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and also on the museum’s Acquisitions Board. She has also been a member of the selection committee for the Art Dealer’s Association of America.

Sundaram Tagore

Sundaram Tagore, Sundaram Tagore gallery, New York, Singapore and Hong Kong

Sundaram Tagore is a Calcutta-born, Oxford-educated art historian, gallerist and an award-winning filmmaker. A descendant of the influential poet and Nobel Prize-winner Rabindranath Tagore, he promotes East-West dialogue through his contributions to numerous exhibitions as well as his four art galleries and their multicultural and multidisciplinary events. Before opening his own gallery, Tagore was a director at Pace Wildenstein Gallery in New York. He has also advised and worked with many international organisations including the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi; the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the United Nations. He is a trustee of the Isamu Noguchi Museum in New York.

Rakeb Sile

Rakeb Sile, Addis Fine Art, Addis Ababa and London

Rakeb co-founded Addis Fine Art in 2016 in the heart of Addis Ababa after years of working as a management consultant in London. Listed as one of the "Most Important Young Galleries in the World" (Artsy 2019), it is the very first local white cube space and international platform based in Ethiopia. The gallery focuses on highlighting modern and contemporary fine art from the Horn of Africa region and its Diasporas. In October 2016, the AFA Project Space was opened in London to expand the international programme centred around Diaspora voices. Now the London gallery will move to a permanent office space and full programme in Cromwell Place.

Ayo Adeyinka

Ayo Adeyinka, Tafeta, London

Since its founding, Ayo Adeyinka's London gallery Tafeta has remained a leading purveyor of important 20th century African art, whilst constantly showcasing new contemporary talent. With a background in financial services, Adeyinka has over time gained recognition as a leading specialist in contemporary African art. Adeyinka is a seasoned cultural entrepreneur and has acted as a consultant for key contemporary African art projects. In April 2018, he was a featured discussion leader at the New York Times Art Leaders Network conference in Berlin, and continues to champion contemporary African art in and out of the continent.

  • Find information on the other panels in this series here.