Science

Survival of the fittest: join artists for 12-hour live drawing session inspired by Charles Darwin

The virtual drawing marathon takes place 23 October on the South South platform

Healing Arts programme comes to New York with a two-month schedule of events

Artist commissions, expert discussions and film premieres will take place in the city, starting and ending with a pair of symposia at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Machu Picchu may be decades older than previously thought

Radiocarbon dating of human bones and teeth in Peruvian ruins indicate that the Inca first lived at the citadel around 1420, not after 1440

An ancient Roman road may lie beneath Venice’s lagoon, researchers say

Team using sonar technology have found evidence of structures and settlements on the seafloor

Ageing plastic from Communist East Germany comes under the microscope in Getty research project

Scientists will study how Soviet-era household objects "made to last 30 or 40 years" can be preserved

Off with her head! Infrared technology shows how a 15th-century French king used a paintbrush to replace one wife with another

Francis I of Brittany had his first wife painted over in a medieval prayer book before giving it to his new spouse, research at Cambridge's Fitzwilliam Museum shows

Scientists unveil 'whitest paint ever'—and museums can't wait to get their hands on it

The material, which reflects 98% of light, will have significant use in cooling buildings and fighting climate change

Dr Fauci’s 3-D printed coronavirus model given to Smithsonian

The educational aide will be part of a forthcoming exhibition at the National Museum of American History

Reap what we sow: Trevor Paglen’s new flower works take an allegorical view of AI

Created during quarantine, the artist’s Bloom series is about the fragility of life, and how computer systems interpret the complexity of humanity

Pandemic art: how artists have depicted disease

As the coronavirus forces us to endure an unprecedented time of distant social contact, art can remind us, assure us, of our interconnectedness

New secrets of Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring to be revealed online next week

Mauritshuis museum's detailed technical examination uncovers new findings on the Dutch artist's brushwork, pigments and technique

Booksreview

Of fossils, prisms and volcanoes: the scientific and imaginative investigations of the polymath Goethe

This extensive volume explores the relationship between the German writer's visual imagination and his fascination with natural science

A beautiful compendium of Early Modern scientific instruments

This exhibition catalogue shows European technological discoveries from the 16th to the 19th century

Book reveals the ways in which artists helped make scientific discoveries

From the 17th to the end of the 19th century natural history depended on illustrations for clarification

Technologyarchive

Ancient cities rise again: Introducing virtual archaeology

Technology developed by a California-based firm has made it possible to walk through vanished sites.

Venice has no official plan for how to deal with climate change

A new report by Icomos details how the science/culture divide is stopping world heritage coming to the aid of climate change and urges speedy action

Book looks at the persistence of the scroll throughout the Middle Ages

Even when the codex became ubiquitous, scrolls held a special place for the written word

Booksreview

Coming out of one’s shell: new book explores overlooked mollusc art by naturalist's daughters

Martin Lister enlisted his daughters Susanna and Anna because of the unreliability of the best professional engravers

Booksreview

William Hunter and the enlightened art of science

A new publication brings together the Scottish surgeon's art collection for the first time in many years

A man-made landscape is writ large on the screen in Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

After its US premier at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, the visually stunning documentary heads to Berlin

How pioneering climate-change science dated one of Britain's oldest houses

Landmark Trust's restoration finds that oak timber used to build Welsh house was felled in the winters of 1418-19 and 1420-21

Unesconews

Goodbye Venice, goodbye Ravenna, goodbye Ferrara, goodbye Carthage?

Many World Heritage Sites around the Mediterranean are at grave risk from sea-level rise by 2100, report says

When the avant-garde met E=mc2: the story behind Dimensionism

Supported by prominent figures in its day, the little known movement is at last being rescued from obscurity

Uffizi launches Leonardo da Vinci 500th celebrations across Italy

New exhibition in Florence decodes the “startlingly radical” scientific ideas of the Codex Leicester

Art meets science in new gallery at King’s College London

Free venue joins a growing global network of Science Gallery spaces

Trevor Paglen lets you view the world as the machines see it

Ahead of his retrospective at Washington, DC's Smithsonian American Art Museum, the artist discusses his interest in the social and political implications of technologies, including mass surveillance systems and artificial intelligence

Gerhard Richter creates Foucault pendulum for Münster church

Artist's donated installation pays tribute to "a small victory for science"

Dinosaur skeleton previously unknown to science auctioned at the Eiffel Tower

Aguttes sold the fossil to an anonymous buyer, who may name the new species, despite protests from paleontologists

Artists deliver climate-change message that time is running out

They are increasingly sounding the alarm on global warming, through new works and collaborations with scientists

Lawnews

The dark web, surveillance dolls and Van Gogh’s zombie ear: technology’s role in art debated at Boston conference

While artists and museums embrace futuristic tools, legal experts point to a number of pitfalls with cutting-edge work

Cern’s resident artists to create work for Art Basel

Darkroom installation will use data collected at the particle physics centre

Robot wars: Mark Pauline and Survival Research Laboratories

The Bay Area artist and his team build massive machines that act in dangerous performances—and they are opening their first gallery show in New York

Met’s science labs shed light on other museums’ collections

New York institutions are accessing equipment and expertise thanks to $2m, six-year grant

A Syrian in space

The astronaut Muhammed Faris was hailed a national hero in 1987 after accompanying a Soviet crew on a trip to the Mir space station

There is more to Malevich’s Black Square than a hidden racist joke, Moscow curators reveal

Tretyakov museum may invite foreign experts to conduct further research on the radical work

Sergei Korolev: the unknown winner of the space race

As the countdown to London's Cosmonauts show begins, we speak to the daughter of the rocket scientist who blasted Yuri Gagarin into space

Pompeian frescoes cured with antibiotics

Bacteria removed from Villa of the Mysteries frieze during restoration

Oxford's Weston Library to dust for hyperspectral fingerprints

Researchers to use imaging technology to identify invisible-to-the-eye artefacts

Art fairsarchive

Art Basel Miami Beach to be studied for Swiss sociology project

Collectors and dealers alike must prepare for questioning as art-money relationship comes under the microscope

Infrared-light technology gets funding boost

Technology could foresee deterioration of artworks

"Naked scanners" being used to research mummies

A new use for airport screening technology

An advance in iron preservation aids conservators

Work on Civil War submarine leads to pioneering technique

Stopping the passage of time: Colour photography conservation

A new technique aims to prevent colour prints from fading—but is it legal?

Booksarchive

Book review: Kirsh and Levenson's "Seeing through paintings: physical examination in art-historical studies"

A popular, non-technical explanation of the physical composition of paintings is not easy

Unescoarchive

Deliberation over ownership of submerged vessels and their booty at the bottom of the ocean leads to Unesco intervention

An estimated three million shipwrecks lay undiscovered. UNESCO is calling for a global treaty to protect them. Salvors say it is unrealistic and unworkable, despite developments in deep-sea exploration technology

Passport to the universe: Virtual reality at the Hayden Planetarium

Clare Henry saw the latest high-tech astronomical display at in New York and says scientists have taken art to new heights

New laser technology for painting restoration

Revolutionary non-contact cleaning method to be unveiled this month at Liverpool’s laser conservation conference

Archaeologists delighted as Schliemann's Trojan treasure becomes available for research

British scientists describe the new techniques which could be used to investigate the recently revealed gold and silver hoard

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