Young British Artists

Book Clubinterview

Old Master meets YBAs: James Cahill tells us all about his debut novel

The author explains why his new coming-of-age novel is set against the backdrop of the 1990s art world and what drew him to the paintings of the titular Tiepolo

Britain's young artists had a hard time before the pandemic. What will happen to them now?

Inequality is rife in British society, not least in the arts, where decades of ‘class-cleansing’ policies have made it harder than ever to be an artist and designer

Interview with Liam Gillick: “There’s a perversity in my method”

With a biennial, two shows and a knitwear range on the go, Liam Gillick talks about the lasting effect of his Goldsmiths years

Still a 'Sensation': How much do the Young British Artists matter in 2010, as they enter middle age?

What is the critical and market sentiment around the artists who made headlines at the Royal Academy, in London, 13 years ago?

Do the Young British Artists remain a 'sensation'?

The debate regarding the relevancy of the Young British Artists as they enter middle age

The landmark exhibition 'Sensation': who were the big buyers of Charles Saatchi's art collection?

An Art Newspaper investigation reveals that, nine years after the controversial Royal Academy show, US collectors and institutions had acquired many of the pieces shown at "Sensation" in 1997

Interview with Michael Landy post-'Breakdown': New directions and championing of the urban weed

Last year Michael Landy meticulously catalogued and then destroyed all his material possessions. For his latest show he has photographed and etched the plants that grow spontaneously throughout the city

Interview with Mat Collishaw: Nappy change for art

Disillusioned and sick of heavy-handed art that tries to shock, the artist has now turned to kitsch and sentimental themes

'A climactic moment in the history of British art': curator Norman Rosenthal on his 'Sensation' show

Eight months after the opening of the major exhibition, the man who responsible for staging the controversial show says it mattered because it reflected an unprecedented scale of art-making in Britain