From the archive

Tate Modern turns 20

To mark the London museum’s big birthday, we have searched our archive for our favourite articles on the institution, from a critic's take on the café’s cuisine to an interview with Tate’s former director Nicholas Serota ahead of the Switch House’s opening in 2016

Arab Springanalysis

The ripple effect of the Arab Spring

Political upheaval across the region presents challenges—and opportunities—for artists and collectors

From the archive | Louvre pyramid architect I.M. Pei on the church-like museum he designed for the Goulandris collection

In this 1994 interview, he reveals how he likes art to be displayed, such as natural lighting for Impressionists

The demolition of the Berlin Wall had immediate effects on German life. But how did it affect artists?

By far the most comprehensive artistic testimony were paintings in what immediately became known as the East Side Gallery

Notes from a demolition: five works about the Wall in Berlin collections

From Frank Thiel's Stadt to Tacita Dean's Palast, some of the best works about the Wall and life in Berlin after reunification

How Mitte embodied new artistic spirit of Berlin after the Wall came down

East German area became a space of possibilities, not unlike inner-city New York or east London before they were gentrified

Since the fall of the Wall, Berlin has established itself as the artists' capital

Despite not being rich, the city has a large percentage of professional creatives and a booming gallery scene

Throughout the Cold War Berlin’s museums quietly kept in touch—when the Wall came down, they embraced

This archive article, taken from our feature looking back at the fall of the Berlin Wall 25 years later, shows how German culture remained linked when politics broke down

In search of art out of Africa: an interview with Jean Pigozzi

“I feel that at the time of the Medici they had my kind of rapport with their artists”

Church and State disagree over management of religious heritage in France

The country possesses more than 32,000 churches, 6,000 chapels and 87 cathedrals. Their dual administration has caused serious problems of management and conservation

From the archive: gossip from The Armory Show over the years

Donald Judd's studio secrets spilled, multi-tasking gallerists and Glenn Lowry's statement sans collar suit

In pictures: 15 years at Art Basel in Miami Beach

From the fair's director Marc Spiegler playing football on the beach to the collector Jorge Pérez getting a lift from rapper Wyclef Jean, some of our favourite images from the archive

The Queen's image: how portrayals of Elizabeth II changed over her lifetime

From Cecil Beaton to Annie Leibovitz and from Pietro Annigoni to Lucian Freud, a broad spectrum of image-makers have portrayed the Queen

From the archive, 1 October 1990: 'We did not pursue any party political nonsense on the Museum Island'

On the 25th anniversary of German reunification, we republish our first ever front-page story, in which East Berlin museums chief Günter Schade defends his record and reveals how East German museums sold in order to buy

Did Marcel Duchamp steal Elsa’s urinal?

The founding object of conceptualism was probably “by a German baroness”, but this debate is rarely aired

From muted to politically charged: upheaval in the Middle East on show at the Venice Biennale

Nations are taking contrasting approaches to the region’s continuing political and social chaos

Heritage caught in the crossfire in wake of Arab Spring

From Macedonia to Mali, the culture of the Islamic world is in an ideological and territorial struggle

A true icon: Pietro Annigoni’s 1955 portrait of Queen Elizabeth II

The story of the royal portrait that has most deeply embedded itself in British consciousness and was adopted all over the Commonwealth

Arab protesters put their art on the streets

Artists have used the walls of Cairo, Damascus and Tripoli to document the uprisings

Still a 'Sensation': How much do the Young British Artists matter in 2010, as they enter middle age?

What is the critical and market sentiment around the artists who made headlines at the Royal Academy, in London, 13 years ago?

The landmark exhibition 'Sensation': who were the big buyers of Charles Saatchi's art collection?

An Art Newspaper investigation reveals that, nine years after the controversial Royal Academy show, US collectors and institutions had acquired many of the pieces shown at "Sensation" in 1997

Where is the art from the ‘Sensation’ show? A list of the collectors in 2006

An Art Newspaper investigation tracks the ownership history of art from Charles Saatchi's collection shown at the Royal Academy in 1997

The Royal Collection's list of paintings acquired in the first 50 years of Elizabeth II's reign

The acquisitions have not been ostentatious, with a significant portion of them being historic royal portraits, bequests or donations

'For the King’s pleasure': a ground-breaking study of the interiors of Windsor Castle by a director of the Royal Collection under Elizabeth II

A landmark account of George IV’s decorations and furnishings at Windsor Castle, by Hugh Roberts, who was closely involved in the restoration of many of those interiors following the 1992 fire

'A climactic moment in the history of British art': curator Norman Rosenthal on his 'Sensation' show

Eight months after the opening of the major exhibition, the man who responsible for staging the controversial show says it mattered because it reflected an unprecedented scale of art-making in Britain

Pleasant and acceptable: how Pietro Annigoni came to create a second portrait of Queen Elizabeth II in 1970

In 1967 the National Portrait Gallery in London did not own a portrait of the monarch—but commissioning one was to prove a challenge

Charles Saatchi: the man behind the Young British Art collection showcased in the 'Sensation' exhibition

As show opens at the Royal Academy, we ask what drives Saatchi to buy and risk so much, using access to his collection's archive to chart a 25-year transformation in his taste