Art fairs: how did they begin and where are they going?

Plus, Caribbean-British art at Tate Britain and Marco Brambilla's VR work at Pérez Art Museum in Miami

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Gagosian at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2021 © Art Basel

Gagosian at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2021 © Art Basel

The Week in Art

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world’s big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie’s.

This week, as Art Basel in Miami Beach takes place, we discuss a new book, The Art Fair Story: a Rollercoaster Ride, with its author Melanie Gerlis, art market columnist at the Financial Times and editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper. Melanie ponders the past, present and future of art fairs.

An installation view of Life Between Islands: Caribbean-British Art 1950s-Now at Tate Britain London © Tate photography

A huge new show, Life Between Islands: Caribbean-British Art 1950s-Now has just opened at Tate Britain in London, and we talk to its curators, Alex Farquharson, the director of Tate Britain, and David A Bailey, the artistic director of the International Curators Forum and the organiser of numerous seminal exhibitions on diaspora and Black representation in art.

Seven levels of purgatory in fewer than five minutes: Heaven's Gate by Marco Brambilla Courtesy of the artist and Pérez Art Museum Miami

And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we’re back in Miami—our deputy digital editor Aimee Dawson talks to the artist Marco Brambilla about Heaven’s Gate, his new virtual reality work at the Pérez Art Museum.


The Art Fair Story: a Rollercoaster Ride by Melanie Gerlis is published by Lund Humphries and priced £19.99 in the UK, $34.99 in the US and $46.99 in Canada.

Life Between Islands: Caribbean-British Art, 1950s-Now is at Tate Britain until 3 April 2022. David A Bailey’s book with Allison Thompson, Liberation Begins in the Imagination—an anthology of writings on Caribbean-British art and culture—is also published by Tate and priced £30.

Marco Brambilla: Heaven’s Gate is at the Pérez Art Museum Miami until 1 February next year. An in-depth review of Heaven’s Gate by The Art Newspaper’s XR Panel can be found here.

The Week in Art podcast byThe Art Newspaper is available every Friday on our website and all the usual places where you find podcasts. This podcast is sponsored by Christie's.

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