Bendor Grosvenor

Bendor Grosvenor is an art historian and broadcaster

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Why take binoculars on your next museum visit? You might solve an art history mystery

An unattributed painting in Lincolnshire's Burghley House bears a striking resemblance to the work of Hans Eworth

The British Museum's NFT project has sent its carbon footprint soaring

Since the London museum began selling digital versions of works from its collection last September, it has emitted enough carbon to power an average US home for at least 57 years

In a world of digital innovation, what if art becomes… boring?

A virtual reality visit to the Sistine Chapel made me realise that museums are going to have to up their game in order to maintain visitors' interest

The British Museum demeans itself by selling its works as NFTs—and will probably live to regret it

In giving cultural validity to meaningless reproductions of Turner and Hokusai pieces, The British Museum blurs the lines between real and fake at its peril

Omicron won't thwart my Old Master mission

My trip to Munich's Alte Pinakothek was worth the multiple levels of Covid-related admin

And the award goes to… my wholly personal choices of the best of the art world in 2021

Bendor Grosvenor selects his favourite exhibition, discovery, book and auction consignment of the year

UK heritage charity the National Trust is ending the year richer than ever—so why all the staff cuts?

The more than 1,700 workers who lost their jobs last year have every right to feel aggrieved as Trust weathers storm regardless of staff savings

Mourning the loss of a fine Rembrandt scholar

Ernst van der Wetering's death this summer leaves a vacancy for an appointed representative of the Dutch master on earth

'The art in Spain stays mainly off the plane': grim Brexit news from the art buying frontline

I've learned the new political lessons about art shipping the hard way—so you don't have to

Visiting a historic house should be about more than just cream teas and crocuses—their full histories, however unsettling, should be told

Being told about National Trust houses' connections to slavery should not deter visitors: the complex history adds to their interest

The UK Ministry of Culture is where politicians' careers go to die—but Oliver Dowden has emerged victorious, thanks to the culture wars

The future integrity of the arts sector will depend on whether institutions are able to stand up to the next culture secretary

Boo to NFTs! Hang on, think of no customs fees

As Brexit makes buying anything from Europe almost impossible, purchasing questionable digital art is almost tempting

'Autism made me an art historian. But museums must do more to welcome disabled and neurodiverse communities'

Museums were quick to implement Covid-19 safety measures and now they need to apply that same rigour to improving accessibility

Museums have hastily cut their staff to save money—what will happen when visitors return and they need them back?

With vaccines now being deployed and a return to normality on the horizon, institutions may find they have been shortsighted in letting their employees go

Auction houses have finally entered the Amazon age—and I’m addicted

I thought I’d kicked my online art and antiques buying habit but too much lockdown screen time has been my undoing

People see only 'silver tits' and 'bouffant pubes' now—but I predict Mary Wollstonecraft sculpture will become widely admired

One of the iron rules of art history is that the more derided a work of art at first, the more celebrated it will become

Is the UK seeing the emergence of a ‘Godfather approach’ to arts funding?

Culture secretary Oliver Dowden has been ignoring the arm's length principle and offering museums unsolicited advice

I finally went to see some art—and caught Covid-19

A trip to the National Gallery was eerie and alien—although a newly restored Van Dyck painting briefly shook off my anxiety

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'Be commercially minded or lose future funding': UK government's threat puts museums in peril

In a letter leaked to The Art Newspaper, the culture minister Oliver Dowden tells directors they must raise their own funds during the pandemic—but how?

National Trust restructuring plans are ‘one of the most damaging assaults on art historical expertise ever seen in the UK’

Job cuts and planned repurposing of country houses will lead to a corporatisation of the nation's heritage sites

'When the politics change, so must the statues'

History can teach us a lot about how to—and how not to—deal with problematic historic monuments

Museums are about to reopen—but should they?

Social distancing measures mean a lot of money will be spent on a small number of visitors, institutions should be focusing on their online presence instead

Must London always win? National Gallery of Scotland cancels Titian show for all the wrong reasons

By bowing out of the Renaissance blockbuster tour, the Edinburgh museum has not only let down the Scottish public but shown its priorities are misplaced

'Being an art historian now is easier and more productive than it’s ever been'

Publishers and libraries are extending their online access to help art historians put their period of enforced seclusion to good use

Mona Lisa, Rembrandt and Venus enjoy a well-earned rest during lockdown

After the coronavirus pandemic, we will need our museums' masterpieces as never before

Coronavirus: dispatches from Italy and China

We speak to our journalists Anna Somers Cocks and Lisa Movius about their experiences of lockdown. Plus, we begin a new feature—Lonely Works—where we look at individual works of art that are now hanging unseen in galleries. Produced in association with Bonhams, auctioneers since 1793

Hosted by Ben Luke. with guest speakers Anna Somers Cocks, Lisa Movius and Bendor Grosvenor. Produced by Julia Michalska, David Clack and Aimee Dawson

Is art history becoming too woke?

Discussion around Yale's decision to pull its introductory survey course reveals unnerving trend for "morally appropriate" studies

What can mysterious markings in stone teach us about British art?

Research for a new book begins with a pilgrimage to find prehistoric rock art in northern England

Disneyfication at the National Gallery? Plus, the problem with deaccessioning in the UK

The stigma around state museums selling works means that other institutions dare not buy them; and a frank review of the National Gallery's Leonardo exhibition