Can the art world really change its wasteful ways?

Plus, Mark Rothko’s late paintings at Pace’s new London space and Nicolas Poussin at the National Gallery

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Major art collectors are known to fly to art fairs by private jet, one of the most polluting forms of transportation © Chris Leipelt

Major art collectors are known to fly to art fairs by private jet, one of the most polluting forms of transportation © Chris Leipelt

The Week in Art

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world’s big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie’s.

This week, as the Frieze art fairs open and the international art world descends on London, we talk about Mark Rothko’s late paintings, now on view at Pace’s new space in the British capital, with his son Christopher. He also reflects on Rothko’s Seagram Mural paintings, which are now back at Tate Britain, close to JMW Turner’s works, as Rothko had hoped when he gave them to the Tate.

Louisa Buck talks to Heath Lowndes, managing director of the Gallery Climate Coalition (GCC), a charity founded by galleries across the world in response to the climate emergency—the GCC has a booth at the Frieze London fair.

And, for this episode’s Work of the Week, Ben Luke visits Poussin and the Dance, a show at the National Gallery in London that travels to the Getty Center in Los Angeles next year. There, Francesca Whitlum-Cooper, the show’s curator, tells us about Poussin’s obsession with the Borghese Dancers, an ancient Roman bas-relief now in the Louvre, and how the French artist responded to it in his painting.

The Week in Art podcast byThe Art Newspaper is available every Friday on our website and all the usual places where you find podcasts. This podcast is sponsored by Christie's.

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